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TOPIC: Safety Guidelines

Safety Guidelines 17 Jul 2014 23:04 #46313

  • Steve
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As the MMS movement has advanced, some new technologies have been added. Some of these new ideas and methods have sprung from people doing research on their own. Many people have also started making CDS, CDH, MMS2 capsules, MMS and Activator solutions on their own.
The Genesis2 Church appreciates this, and with that appreciation in mind, would like to publish this article and list of safety warnings, procedures, and precautions that should be followed.

Please be assured that these dangers do not exist if one is simply following the protocols. This is for people who handle and store larger amounts, or make their own Sacraments.

Please take the time to read and understand this, and benefit from the wisdom of those of us who have, over the years, learned the hard way.


RAW MATERIALS

OXIDIZERS
Sodium Chlorite Powder, and Calcium Hypochlorite are both Class 5.1 oxidizers.
Oxidizers by nature are not combustible, but enhance combustion. Once it reaches the point of rapid decomposition, it is like opening an oxygen tank in a fire. These items should be always be kept away from heat sources, and any organic material.These products are also highly corrosive in conditions of humidity. Take care to keep dry, and well stored in it's original packaging. Both are hydroscopic and will draw moisture from the air.


SODIUM CHLORITE POWDER OR FLAKE (NaClO2)
Sodium Chlorite powder should be stored and kept away from all acids, sulfur, petroleum distillates, and organic material. It can combust spontaneously if contaminated. If it becomes contaminated, dilute with water, and flush to sewer with copious amounts of water. Do not flush to septic system. If no sewer, dilute in large bucket, and let it sit outside a few days.
Any spills should be swept with a broom with plastic bristles, and the remainder should absorbed with a non flammable substance (i.e kitty litter, clay).If you use a cloth or paper towel, rinse thoroughly, before allowing it to dry. Never add anything Sodium Chlorite Powder except Distilled or purified water (RO) Products like CDS and CDH should be made using MMS, never use powder to try to make these.

CALCIUM HYPOCHLORITE
Calcium hypochlorite can also ignite in the presence of organic materials.
In case of a spill, do not add water, water will form hypochlorus acid, and the fumes can damage mucous membranes. Calcium hypochlorite is hydroscopic and will draw moisture from the air. If your supply becomes moist, discard of properly. Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Do not directly breath fumes. Don't make more capsules than you need for a month.
!!!WARNING!!!
DO NOT LET CALCIUM HYPOCHLORITE COME INTO CONTACT WITH DMSO.
CALCIUM HYOCHLORITE IN CONTACT WITH 90% or HIGHER DMSO CAUSES A REACTION THAT CAN IGNITE. 99.9% DMSO WILL CAUSE COMBUSTION ON CONTACT.




CORROSIVES

HYDROCHLORIC ACID
Hydrochloric acid in bulk is usually 30-37.5% in strength. This product is extremely corrosive, and will digest flesh, and can cause permanent blindness. Fumes from full strength HCl can damage your lungs. Care needs to be taken when handling this item. Never use full strength to make CDS or CDH.
Avoid splatter. Use proper safety precautions when diluting. The 4 to 5% range the protocols call for are safe to use. Avoid getting in eyes.
!!!WARNING!!!
AVOID OXIDIZERS. SODIUM CHLORITE POWDER AND FULL STRENGTH HCL WILL EXPLODE AND GENERATE HEAT ON CONTACT.


CITRIC ACID
Citric Acid is a much weaker acid than HCl. If it gets in contact with skin or eyes, wash well with water.
Use care when diluting. Avoid oxidizers. Follow safety procedures.

SODIUM CHLORITE SOLUTION
Sodium Chlorite Solution is also a Class 8 corrosive. It can rust stainless steel in a few minutes.
It can also cause alkaline burns if in contact with skin for too long. In case of a spill, rinse all cloth and organic material well before it dries.

SOLVENTS

DMSO
DMSO is a solvent, and can pass quickly through the skin and into the tissues.
It will also carry other substances along with it. You cannot use most common gloves with DMSO.
It will dissolve the gloves, and can transfer the glove material. Nitrile offers very short term protection.
Natural rubber or latex offer a bit more, but no standard thin disposable glove is suitable.
Be sure your hands are clean and free from contaminants when handling DMSO. If applying it topically, be sure the area to which you apply it is clean.
!!!WARNING!!!
DO NOT LET CALCIUM HYPOCHLORITE COME INTO CONTACT WITH DMSO.
CALCIUM HYOCHLORITE IN CONTACT WITH 90% or HIGHER DMSO CAUSES A REACTION THAT CAN IGNITE. 99.9% DMSO WILL CAUSE COMBUSTION ON CONTACT.




MAKING SACRAMENTS

CDS
CDS is Aqueous Chlorine Dioxide. This means that the actual Chlorine Dioxide gas is absorbed into water.
Standard strength is usually 3000 ppm (.03%). It is classified for shipping as a Class 8 corrosive.
There are various methods and videos showing how to make CDS. We recommend the "shot glass" method for personal use. If a spill should occur, avoid breathing the fumes, and try to avoid getting them into your eyes. Wipe up immediately, and rinse the cloth with large amounts of water. If you handle amounts over 16 oz. please use the proper safety precautions.

People who make CDS by other methods need to be aware that the concentrations of fumes in the activation chamber can exceed the amount needed to be combustible in gaseous form, particularly if you are using a pressure/heat method. Pressures can build up quickly using this method.
Once again, we recommend using only the shot glass method, if you are unfamiliar with the process and laboratory procedures.

CDH
CDH (Chlorine Dioxide Holding Solution) is acidified sodium chlorite. Like CDS it is considered a class 8 corrosive, and is also standardized at 3000 ppm of Chlorine dioxide. Use the same procedures for spills as you would with CDS. Avoid breathing the fumes.

MMS2
Use care when making capsules. Work in a dry place... calcium hypochlorite is hydroscopic and will draw moisture from the air. Avoid fumes, and if your granules or powder becomes moist, discard it.
If you use a capsule machine, use one that is not made from stainless steel.


Please use common sense, and safety procedures. Keep a clean workspace.
Nitrile Gloves can be used with Sodium Chlorite, Calcium Hypochlorite, and HCl.
Most gloves are not recommended for use with DMSO.
Sodium Thiosulfate (Chlorine Neutralizer) solution can be used in case of spills of CDS or CDH.
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Last Edit: by fourfingerz.

Safety Guidelines 18 Jul 2014 20:32 #46326

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Steve has also previously recommended long term storage of sealed containers of sodium chlorite in the freezer.
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Safety Guidelines 15 Jan 2015 21:53 #48826

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Thanks Steve,

I appreciate having found this as I have been surprised, for example, by the casual mention in videos and written copy that CDS (Chlorine Dioxide Solution) can explode under certain conditions - and yet little has been expanded upon to guide the average user on how to handle it properly in process of taking it.

As someone who would like to take CDS and recommend it responsibly to others, could you please offer clear guidance on the safety of handling CDS in the way that a user might normally handle it?

SPECIFICALLY, if I have a 4oz bottle of CDS, whether purchased or made, at approx. 3000ppm (as per protocol), I understand that it should be kept in the fridge. These further questions arise:

1. If one wants to mix a batch to take with them for the day, such as a mix of 8ml of CDS in 22 to 32oz of water, and put it in a glass jar - how much sun exposure and/or heat exposure during the day might cause an explosion?

1b. Or would such a diluted solution not be of concern for explosions?

1c. And what would such an explosion look like? ie. the lid might blow off; the glass bottle would explode shooting glass a few feet, or 50 feet; the explosion in a hand might permanently damage that hand, etc?

2. If a 4oz glass amber bottle of CDS at 3000ppm were left out in the heat and sun to the point of exploding, what are we talking about with regard to the degree of an explosion?

3. I put about 5 drops of CDS in a 4oz size amber bottle for a healing practitioner who muscle tests for patient remedies. If that were left out of the fridge all day in a room that was exposed to sun and in a comfortable room temperature, would there be concern of explosion, and again, what would such an explosion look like?

Any other comments as you get the gist of what I am asking about - guidance around the explosiveness of CDS per protocol as used by someone not knowledgable about safety with CDS.

Thanks so much Steve.

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Safety Guidelines 21 Jan 2015 07:33 #48858

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fourfingerz wrote:

Learning to follow protocols is important - but understanding safety is just as important, read Steve's post:

g2cforum.org/index.php/list/experimental-protocol-for-research/28675-safety-guidelines#46313
2826


Yes, that's pretty much sure.

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Safety Guidelines 24 Feb 2015 19:58 #49132

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I posted a question on this thread and never received any response at all. Instead, fourfingerz keeps posting nothing on it, triggering an email to me as I am subscribed hoping someone might actually respond to the only question here. Fourfingerz why do you keep posting nothing but a link to this post?

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Safety Guidelines 24 Feb 2015 20:32 #49135

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Yunus, Martin bumps this thread to keep this important topic on page one so we will be reminded to heed what it says.

Steve does not often read the forum as he is too busy.

CDS is safe if kept in solution. It is the chlorine dioxide gas that can be explosive. It tends to stay in solution when kept below 50F, so that is why it is best to keep it in a fridge. Placing a bottle of CDS in direct sunlight is not recommended. A daily bottle of CDS contains much less CLO2 that a stock solution of CDS. I doubt a daily bottle of CDS in direct sunshine would be a problem.

The only reported bangs are from people making CDS using the heating method and why the overnight method is suggested.
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2 ml of 3000 ppm original CDS equals a 1 drop MMS1 dose in a normal stomach
www.mmsinfo.org/infosheets/mms1_equates_to_cdh_and_cds.pdf
Websites: MMSinfo.org * www.facebook.com/groups/ebolacures/
YouTube Instructional Videos: www.youtube.com/channel/UCXv6hCnvjMmGg4_AYq4wlNw
Answers to many questions are in Jim Humble's books: jhbooks.org/
How to use CDS, CDH in Protocols: www.mmsinfo.org/infosheets/CDS_CDH_and_Protocols-2.pdf
Last Edit: by CLO2.

Safety Guidelines 24 Aug 2015 12:44 #50121

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fourfingerz wrote:
Learning to follow protocols is important - but understanding safety is just as important, read Steve's post:

g2cforum.org/index.php/list/experimental...ety-guidelines#46313
7348

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Martin

Safety Guidelines 01 Sep 2015 06:59 #50161

  • EleanorDixon
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Ya its true. To follow protocols is important.

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Safety Guidelines 02 Sep 2015 06:01 #50165

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what push the trigger of an explosion is a "esoteric science". only a small group of reasons are known. exist a lot "unknown" and others are simple "magical reasons". you can read the MSDS de some chemicals or books in lab security and convince for yourself.

for exemple I get a liter of water in a lake in Pirineus, I put this glass bottle in the fridge, after 1 year o so the bottle exploded! not with a big boom but I find pieces of glass around, uh? pure water from the mountains exploding? :) any idiot can say this is because putrefaction from organic matter started, not empty space in the bottle... pure idiotism, the bottle have empty space, no organic matter in the water, no freezing...

if a bottle is put in the sun can explode or not, depends of the season of the year, the sun force, clouds or not, the quality of the bottle... if you cut cheap glass bottles you can see the interior surface forming spots of magnifying glasses, water drops also work like magnifying glasses... and so on!

my 5 cents

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